China may ease family planning restrictions

China appears poised to drop its family planning policy with state-run newspapers citing a draft civil code that would change decades of rules on the numbers of children citizens can have

China appears poised to drop its family planning policy with state-run newspapers citing a draft civil code that would change decades of rules on the numbers of children citizens can have

China has relaxed its family planning policy as its population grows old, birth rates dwindle and its manpower diminishes.

Officials are drafting a new civil code that has yet to make any reference to family planning, meaning that the government may be rethinking their restrictive policies.

The change would effectively remove child-birth restrictions, which over the past decades have limited but also aged China's population, led to gender-ratio imbalances and have been notoriously enforced through huge fines and forced abortions.

China is mulling scrapping its controversial birth restrictions, reversing almost four decades of family planning policies as birth rates fall.

The draft civil code, which is being discussed by the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress this week, is set to be completed by 2020.

Bloomberg on Tuesday also cited People's Daily, another state-run newspaper, as saying that the new draft of the civil code had removed all "family planning-related content".

Beijing already loosened its so-called "one-child policy" in 2016 by allowing Chinese couples to have two children amid a drop in the workforce.

Chinese couples are now allowed to have a maximum of two children.

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"The created generation, us only children, let's gather together and prepare to work in our twilight years", another user wrote.

China Post president Liu Aili, left, and stamp designer Han Meilin present a design showing two pigs and three piglets in Beijing on August 6.

Authorities hoped that relaxing the one-child limit to two would solve the country's demographic problems, but it hasn't.

Couples who themselves were only children could also apply to have additional children.

Leta Hong Fincher, author of Betraying Big Brother: The Feminist Awakening in China, commented that the changes proposed by the government to encourage people to have more children have not been successful and that she is unsure of how the government can further incentivize people to do so, wrote The Guardian.

"Whatever policy they implement", Fincher said, "they will continue to control women's reproductive rights".

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