Manatee in distress from signs of red tide exposure taken to SeaWorld

A deepening algae bloom seen at a canal behind houses on the south side of Calooshatchee River in the River Oaks on June 27

A deepening algae bloom seen at a canal behind houses on the south side of Calooshatchee River in the River Oaks on June 27

Red tide is not the only algae outbreak that has killed marine life in Florida, with a blue-green algae bloom - that started in Lake Okeechobee - poisoning freshwater rivers in the region.

"During my time in office, we have invested millions of dollars to research and mitigate red tide along Florida's Gulf Coast", Scott said in a statement.

"It's hard to predict more than a few days out [when it will end]", Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission spokeswoman Michelle Kerr told CNN.

"Over the past week, reports were received for multiple locations in Sarasota County, in Charlotte County, in and offshore of Lee County, and in Collier County".

Red tides at Sanibel Island in Florida have continued to leave beaches looking like graveyards, with dozens of fish and other sea life washed up on the shore.

What is Florida Red Tide?

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Red tide is the name given to the blooms of a species of microorganisms that have a distinct red colour.

While biologists are still working to determine the cause of death, if the algae bloom did play a role, it would be the first known incident in which a whale shark has been killed by a bloom.

The city is issuing a daily "fish kill clean-up" report because of the "unprecedented volume of dead sea life now washing up".

Fish are safe to eat as long as it is alive when caught and it is fileted before cooking - do not eat it whole.

According to the NWS, beach goers should watch out for the respiratory impacts of red tide including coughing, sneezing, and tearing eyes.

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