Almost one in 11 US tweens and teens vape cannabis

Despite demographics the vast majority of Canadians believe vaping products should not be sold to minors

Despite demographics the vast majority of Canadians believe vaping products should not be sold to minors

The Food and Drug Administration is launching a first-of-its-kind public service campaign against youth vaping on Tuesday that will try new ways of reaching young people who have become hooked on nicotine. But FDA officials say the liquids still meet the statutory definition for a tobacco product. There's also a toolkit of useful information for schools.

The new campaign comes days after FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb's declaration last week that youth vaping has become an "epidemic."

Gottlieb stated while the five dominant e-cigarette manufacturers are the current focus, the policy reconsiderations will apply to all product sales.

"E-cigarettes are now the most commonly used tobacco product among young people in the United States", Mitch Zeller, director of the FDA's Center for Tobacco Products, said at the event.

Posters will appear in the thousands of school bathrooms, Gottlieb says, because that's "a place we know many teens are using e-cigarettes or faced with the peer pressure to do so".

Watertown High School Principal Chad A. Fairchildsaid unlike traditional cigarettes that are easy to detect due to the smell, e-cigarettes are more discreet.

The Show went out to Marcos de Niza High to find out more about it, and spoke with Eric Lauer, the health and wellness coach there.

San Francisco-based Juul said it is working to prevent underage use of its products but added that flavors can help adult smokers quit.

Juuls also provide the user with a potent dose of nicotine, which is addictive and which health officials warn is harmful to developing brains.

Roughly one in 11 American middle and high school students have used cannabis in e-cigarettes, a study suggests.

"E-cigarettes have become an nearly ubiquitous - and unsafe - trend among youth that we believe has reached epidemic proportions", FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb said Tuesday in a statement.

Hailey Boyce suffered severe injuries when an e-cigarette device exploded while she was vaping on Mothers' Day weekend of 2016.

Read the Letter From Christine Blasey Ford Requesting an FBI Investigation
She claims that an intoxicated Kavanaugh pinned her down during a party in Marlyand and attempted to remove her clothing. Scaramella hopes that when Ford testifies, "we can believe that people who are victimized have real harm done to them".

Last spring, I was inundated with requests from curious and concerned parents and schools about vaping.

Making matters worse, almost all tobacco trends among youth are "moving in the wrong direction", Gottlieb told USA TODAY on Monday.

"Kids need to be made aware that this isn't just a harmless fad", said professor Richard Miech, who studies drug use trends at the University of MI.

So the FDA has launched "The Real Cost" Youth E-Cigarette Prevention Campaign aimed at educating kids about the dangers of e-cigarettes, targeting nearly 11 million Americans aged 12 to 17 who have used e-cigarettes or are open to trying them.

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"We've had to start taking some actions before the final results of this data can be made public".

"Cannabis products, whether for medical or recreational use such as cannabis oils and cannabis extracts, are being marketed to adults for use in vaporizers as a safer and/or more efficient way to obtain cannabis", Hall said.

Products introduced after that date must be subjected to a rigorous scientific review process before they are approved.

With increasing use among teens, scrutiny of electronic cigarettes has risen, especially for the fruity and candy flavorants that appeal to young children and teens.

"FDA announcement has the potential to be a dramatic sea change but only if the FDA itself now follow this up with mandatory rules to require tobacco companies to fundamentally change how they're operating", said Matt Myers, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.

While 58 per cent of those aged 55-plus strongly supported the notion of banning flavoured e-cigarettes, only a third of those 18 to 34 agreed with the idea.

"Industry must step up this problem", Gottlieb said.

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