Did a mathematician really solve a million-dollar math problem?

Загадка тысячелетия о развитии теории чисел вскоре будет решена

Загадка тысячелетия о развитии теории чисел вскоре будет решена

If this hypothesis is proved correct it could provide a neat way for mathematicians to find new prime numbers, which are useful for everything from computer encryption to the programming of super computers.

10,000,000,000,000 prime numbers have been checked and are consistent with the equation, but there is no proof that all primes follow the pattern.

It attempts to answer an old question about prime numbers (numbers that divide only by themselves and 1.) The hypothesis states that the distribution of primes is not random, but might follow a pattern described by an equation called the Riemann zeta function.

Primes are useful for everything from computer encryption to the programming of super computers.

However, the German mathematician Bernhard Riemann suggested the exact formula for the number of primes not exceeding a specified value.

Riemann proposed a theory that can, in a way, shed light on that mystery; but he could not prove it, nor could all the brilliant minds that came after.

Clay Mathematics Institute has since 2000 set a million dollar award for anyone who solves any of the six unresolved "Millennium Problems", one of which is the Riemann hypothesis. Once it's accepted, Atiyah can claim his prize money from the Clay Mathematics Institute of Cambridge.

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You can't think about what you're going to do in the future until you've done things in the present. "They did. That attitude made a difference".

Atiyah is well aware of this history of failure.

Mathematician Michael Atiyah presented a "simple proof" of the Riemann hypothesis.

People say we know mathematicians do all their best work before they re 40, Atiyah said recently.

"The proof just stacks one impressive claim on top of another without any connecting argument or real substantiation", John Baez, a mathematical physicist at the University of California, Riverside, told Science. His outline may lead to a complete proof or, more likely, may amount to \nothing.

'Lots of other top-rate mathematicians have almost but not quite managed to prove it over the years, only for a subtle flaw in the proof to become apparent'.

The Clay Millennium Prizes, announced in 2000, were conceived to record seven of the most hard problems with which mathematicians were grappling at the turn of the second millennium. I will present a simple proof using a radically new approach.

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