Hurricane Florence from space: "A no-kidding nightmare"

As North Carolina braces for Hurricane Florence some tourists and residents are worried about the famous wild horses that roam the Outer Banks. But Sue Stuska a wildlife biologist based at Cape Lookout National Seashore said the horses instinctively

As North Carolina braces for Hurricane Florence some tourists and residents are worried about the famous wild horses that roam the Outer Banks. But Sue Stuska a wildlife biologist based at Cape Lookout National Seashore said the horses instinctively

"When I left the Island, AFTER the storm had hit, they had anywhere from 6 to 18 deaths".

The winds of Hurricane Florence weakened as the storm prepared to hit the U.S. East Coast, but forecasters warn the storm's overall size and its ability to push ashore a storm surge while dropping tremendous amounts of rain make it a threat to the lives of those in its path. Storm surge is why many of you have been placed under evacuation and we are asking citizens to please heed a warning. He added later, "Most of the fatalities in these tropical systems is water". The Saffir-Simpson scale that meteorologists use to measure hurricanes reflects only the wind speeds involved in the storm, and right now Hurricane Florence's winds are hovering at maximum speeds of about 110 miles per hour (175 km/h). With the storm expected to "stick" on the high-pressure ridge, moving north, west, or northwest seems to be safest.

But what makes Florence so different from other storms this year? One emergency official said it will be a "Mike Tyson punch" to the area.

Tim Bowen said nearby cities like Kinston and Goldsboro are more inland, but have a history of severe flooding and the situation might be even worse for evacuees.

"I don't care if this goes down to a Category 1", CNN meteorologist Chad Myers said on Thursday. "And that will produce a lot of damage as well as prolong the beach erosion".

Forecasts showed the storm lingering near the coast of the Carolinas, carrying days of heavy rains that could bring intense inland flooding from SC to Virginia.

Some 7,000 guard members are ready to mobilize in North Carolina, while 1,100 will be activated in SC.

While max sustained winds have decreased the area of hurricane force winds has increased. Officials are urging others in its path to follow suit, or prepare for the worst.

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The National Hurricane Centre said it was expected to keep drawing energy from the warm water and intensify to near Category 5, which means winds of 157 miles per hour or higher.

The storm's surge, the rise in sea water above normally dry land at the coast, could reach up to 13 feet at peak. The storm's 12-mph forward speed Thursday morning was a marked drop from Wednesday's 17-mph speeds.

In the image, Hurricane Helene and Hurricane Isaac can be seen circling the Atlantic Ocean while Storm 95L is on a collision course for the Caribbean.

Hurricane Florence, after weeks of warnings, has finally begun to touch down in the Carolinas on Thursday afternoon.

Normally when we talk about the potential for hurricane damage, we talk about the impact of storm surges and high winds - both of which are, to be sure, incredibly unsafe in their own right. A surge of at least 4 feet is predicted for a much larger area.

"Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 70 miles (110 km) from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 175 miles (280 km)". The heaviest rainfall is still expected in South and North Carolina, with upwards of 30 inches of rainfall possible in some locations. The hurricane centre also adjusted its projected track, but kept it north of what most computer models were showing, to provide some continuity with past forecasts.

Florence is set to reach the coastline of North and SC with the risk of flooding at an extreme high.

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