Millennials Are Causing U.S. Divorce Rates To Plummet

Britain's Prince Harry Duke of Sussex kisses his wife Meghan Duchess of Sussex as they leave from the West Door of St George's Chapel Windsor Castle in Windsor

Britain's Prince Harry Duke of Sussex kisses his wife Meghan Duchess of Sussex as they leave from the West Door of St George's Chapel Windsor Castle in Windsor

Bras, top sheets, sleeping with clothes and now. divorce.

The United States divorce rate has dropped 18 percent from 2008 to 2016 according to an analysis done by Philip Cohen, a University of Maryland sociology professor. What's causing this downward trend? While cynics would argue that the drop in divorce rate is simply because the marriage rate has also fallen over the last several decades, Cohen's study focuses on the divorce rate in relation to the number of marriages in those given years.

Cohen reviewed newly-married women (all Wednesday within the last 12 months in his selection period), who were able to illustrate how millennials are trending away from divorce.

"(T) he very divorce-prone, multi-marrying, multi-divorcing baby boomers have moved further out of their peak action years, and it's increasingly clear that divorce rates really are falling for younger people", he wrote in a blog about his findings.

The study, which has not been published in a peer-reviewed journal, has been submitted for presentation at the 2019 Population Association of America meeting, an annual conference for demographers and sociologists to present research.

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Perhaps not surprisingly, divorce rates were highest in occupational settings with lots of young, opposite-sex coworkers, such as hotels and restaurants, and lowest in older, largely single-sex sectors, such as farming and libraries.

"Marriage is more and more an achievement of status, rather than something that people do regardless of how they're doing", Cohen told Bloomberg.

Cohen says millennials are more picky when it comes settling down and doing it later in their adult life. The study notes that newly married women are now "more likely to be in their first marriages, more likely to have BA degrees or higher education, less likely to be under age 25, and less likely to have own children in the household", which Cohen writes can all affect the risk of divorce.

Strikingly, poor and less educated Americans are avoiding marriage, with many opting instead to cohabitate in notably less stable relationships. "Marriage is become more selective, and more stable, even as attitudes toward divorce are becoming more permissive, and cohabitation has grown less stable", Cohen writes in his study.

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