Lifespan 2040 ranking: US down, China up, Spain on top

Singaporeans can expect to live up to an average of 85.4 years in 2040 according to a global study. More

Singaporeans can expect to live up to an average of 85.4 years in 2040 according to a global study. More

Japan till now have the greatest life expectancy ration and there also it is expected to increase and exceed 85 years in case of male and female both, the same case is with China, Singapore, Spain. Life expectancies in both countries were just below 75 in 2040.

They also forecast more optimistic and pessimistic scenarios, in which life expectancy increases to 81 years in the first case, and essentially stagnates in the second.

A new study looking at how life expectancy around the world will have changed by 2040 holds bad news for the US: Of all the high-income countries, the US will take the biggest drop, falling from 43rd place in 2016 to 64th place; the average US life expectancy in 2040 is expected to be 79.8 years.

The study by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington projects that Singaporeans can live up to an average of 85.4 years in 2040, up 2.1 years from the average of 83.3 years in 2016.

Nigeria's life expectancy could increase by as much as 14.2 years in a better health scenario or as little as 5.1 years in a worse health scenario.

The world's poorest countries in 2018 will continue to fair poorly when it comes to life expectancy, according to the study, published in The Lancet.

Americans will live only 1.1 years longer on average in 2040 compared to 2016, well belowthe average global rise of 4.4 years over that same period.

Interestingly, the study also predicts the United States will drop down 21 places in the longevity table, from 43rd place in 2016 to 64th in 22 years' time, with a life expectancy of 79.8 years.

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In addition, the study, published yesterday in the worldwide medical journal The Lancet, projects a significant increase in deaths from non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic kidney disease, and lung cancer, as well as worsening health outcomes linked to obesity.

This new study came from the data collated from the 2016 GBD that lists the possible risks of death due to over 200 diseases between 1990 and 2016.

The study, published on Tuesday in the worldwide medical journal The Lancet, projects a significant increase in deaths from non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic kidney disease, and lung cancer, as well as worsening health outcomes linked to obesity.

IHME said in a statement: "Singapore's ranking as third in the world illustrates the effectiveness of its current health systems at addressing key health drivers", The Straits Times reported.

Ranking a close sixth is air pollution, which scientists estimate claims a million lives a year in China alone.

African countries continue to have the worst rates of premature death, with citizens of the Central African Republic, Lesotho, Somalia and Zimbabwe are still expected to die on average before the age of 65 by 2040. Specifically, 87 countries will experience a decline, and 57 will see an increase of one year or more. They then used information on how each of these independent drivers affects specific causes of death to develop forecasts of mortality.

The study showed a rising toll from severe non-communicable diseases, worsened partly by population growth and ageing.

Furthermore, while NCDs are projected to rise in many low-income countries, communicable, maternal, neonatal, and nutritional diseases are likely to remain among the leading causes of early death, thereby creating a "double burden" of disease.

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