MI man's doorstop rock turns out to be a $100k meteorite

Doorstop turns out to be meteorite worth $100K

Doorstop turns out to be meteorite worth $100K

He asked the then homeowner about it and was told it was a meteorite found on the property in the 1930s.

The man reportedly hasn't figured out exactly where the meteorite will end up, but a number of institutions are apparently considering purchasing it from him for display.

Even though Dr. Sirbescu knew exactly what it was, it had to be sent to the Smithsonian Museum for verification, it wasn't until Thursday word came back it definitively is a meteorite, the 6th largest ever found in MI.

It has been named the "Edmore" meteorite after the town in which the farm is located.

The unnamed man reportedly came into possession of the 22-pound rock when he bought a farm from a family who said that the object was a meteorite.

The 22-pound meteorite was examined under x-ray fluorescence scanning which determined that it was composed of 88 percent iron and 12 percent nickel (a metal that is relatively rare on Earth).

When the new owner moved after a few years, he took the rock with him and continued to use it as a doorstop.

"It's the most valuable specimen I have ever held in my life, monetarily and scientifically", she said.

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The farmer told him it was a meteorite, that it was part of the property and he could have it.

A United States farmer and his son saw a shooting star come crashing onto their property one night in the 1930s.

A man from Grand Rapids, Michigan, who told the university he wanted to remain anonymous, brought the rock to Sirbescu for examination earlier this year. "I'm done using it for a doorstop", he said, "let's get a buyer".

"What typically happens with these at this point is that meteorites can either be sold and shown in a museum or sold to collectors and sellers looking to make a profit", Sirbescu said. If it doesn't buy the entire rock, the slice will stay in its collection.

It's a story that began out of this world almost a hundred years ago when a meteorite crashed down to earth near Edmore, Michigan.

But he's not hoarding the payday, because 10% of the rock's value is already pledged to CMU's earth and atmospheric science students. He is considered the guru of iron meteorites, Sirbescu said, and is doing a neutron activation analysis to determine its chemical composition.

Now the Smithsonian museum is considering buying the space rock, and it could fetch as much as $100,000, the release says.

And geologist Mona Sirbescu said she "could tell right away that this was something special".

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