Scientists detect mysterious radio signals in space

Scientists Find 13 Mysterious Deep Space Flashes Including 2nd Known'Repeater

Scientists Find 13 Mysterious Deep Space Flashes Including 2nd Known'Repeater

It is not known where they originate from though it is thought they come from sources billions of light years away in the Milky Way.

The most likely explanation is that they were created by powerful objects in space.

In 2017, Professor Avid Loeb, from the Harvard-Smithsonian Centre for Astrophysics in the United States, proposed that FRBs could be leakage from planet-sized alien transmitters.

Although scientists have some theories about what causes the so-called repeating fast radio bursts (FRBs) and their origin, exact details are still unknown.

The discoveries made by CHIME were presented Wednesday at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Seattle and published in a pair of accompanying papers in Nature.

The telescope, which resembles a set of skateboarding half-pipes, was built as part of the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) to record radio signals from outer space.

This second repeater, found among the first few CHIME/FRB discoveries, suggests that there exists - and that CHIME/FRB and other wide-field, sensitive radio telescopes will find - a substantial population of repeating FRBs.

Of more than 60 fast radio bursts detected so far, only one of them has ever repeated. "Knowing that there is another suggests that there could be more out there", said Ingrid Stairs, a University of B.C. astrophysicist and member of the CHIME team. Knowing that there is another suggests that there could be more out there.

'And with more repeaters and more sources available for study, we may be able to understand these cosmic puzzles - where they're from and what causes them'.

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Team member Dr Cherry Ng, from the University of Toronto, Canada, said: 'That could mean in some sort of dense clump like a supernova (exploding star) remnant.

"An FRB emitted from a merger of two neutron stars, or a neutron star and a black hole, for example, can not repeat". "But it has to be in some special place tog I've us all the scattering that we see".

The mystery stems from the fact it is not known what could produce such a short and sharp burst.

A fast radio burst lasts only a few milliseconds; due to both the very brief appearance and the inability to predict where they will happen, it has proven very hard for astronomers to study the FRBs.

In 2007, an astronomy professor and his student detected a fast radio burst, a phenomenon that has been detected many times in the years since. "This allows us to study how structures in the Universe formed and how they are distributed".

The FRBs show various temporal scattering behaviours, with the majority significantly scattered, and some apparently unscattered to within measurement uncertainty even at our lowest frequencies.

Another notable attribute of the new FRBs is their unusually low radio frequencies - coming in at 800 megahertz rather than the 1,400 megahertz of most previously detected signals.

In 2017 Loeb and Harvard colleague Manasvi Lingam proposed that FRBs could be leakage from planet-sized alien transmitters.

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