All Tokyo 2020 Olympic medals to be made from e-waste

Olympic organizers said they expect to collect enough obsolete electronic devices to manufacture all Olympic and Paralympic medals

Olympic organizers said they expect to collect enough obsolete electronic devices to manufacture all Olympic and Paralympic medals

Officials said they expect to collect enough obsolete electronic devices by the end of March to extract the amount of gold, silver and bronze that will be required to manufacture all the medals that will be awarded next year. Just the precious metals that happen to be used both for the manufacturing of the aforementioned categories of gadgets and to bestow upon the world's greatest athletes the highest honor in their sporting disciplines.

The Tokyo Organising Committee said Friday that the goal of collecting over 30kg of gold has been nearly completed, with the necessary amount of precious metals expected to be gathered by the end of March.

On Thursday, the Tokyo Organizing Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games (Tokyo 2020) announced that they're expected to reach the goal for their nationwide collection of discarded devices.

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As a result, the target amount of metal needed for Olympic bronze medals was already met last June, and as of October 93.7 percent of the gold need and 85.4 percent of silver had been sourced from donated devices.

By November previous year, municipal authorities had already collected 47,488 tonnes of discarded devices, with the public handing in another five million used phones to a local network provider.

In case you're wondering, the typical iPhone is estimated to contain roughly 0.034 grams of gold and 0.34g of silver, which tells you everything you need to know about the world's e-waste plague. 650,000 tons of electronics are discarded in Japan every year, according to the Nikkei Asian Review.

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