Italy bans unvaccinated children from attending school

Children under six can be barred from attending nursery schools and kindergartens if their parents fail to present written evidence that they have had the required vaccinations.

Under the "Lorenzin law", parents had until March 10, 2019, to provide documentation showing their child had been inoculated with a number of vaccinations, as reported by RAI News, Italy's national public broadcaster. The consequences for failing to comply with the legislation reportedly varies depending on how old the child is.

Italian children lacking proof that they have been vaccinated were turned away from nurseries on Tuesday after the country's populist coalition reversed its previously sceptical stance on the need for compulsory jabs.

The goal of the law, according to a government website, is to fight the gradual decline in Italy's vaccination rates.

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These include vaccinations for chickenpox, polio, measles, mumps, and rubella.

"No vaccine, no school", health minister Giulia Grillo told La Repubblica newspaper.

The city of Bologna reportedly has at least 300 children who now do not comply with the vaccination requirements and are at risk of suspension from school.

Last year, it was reported just 85% of children in Italy were immunised for measles - despite a World Health Organisation recommendation that 95% should be vaccinated in order to prevent outbreaks.

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