Web can be changed for better in next 30 yrs

English computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee best known as the inventor of the World Wide Web delivers a speech during an event at the CERN in Meyrin near Geneva Switzerland

English computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee best known as the inventor of the World Wide Web delivers a speech during an event at the CERN in Meyrin near Geneva Switzerland

Berners-Lee, who has previously rallied for improvements to the technology, said the "fight for the web is one of the most important causes of our time".

"Today, half of the world is online", he said.

The World Wide Web was invented by Tim Berners-Lee in 1989.

Help could also be provided by the Web Foundation, founded by Sir Tim, which is now working with governments, companies and citizens to build a new Contract for the Web, which looks to establish concrete "norms, laws and standards" for the Web.

It's also become a place where tech titans scoop up personal data, rival governments spy and seek to scuttle elections, and hate speech and vitriol have thrived - taking the Web far from its roots as a space for progress-oriented minds to collaborate. In his opinion, people are no longer certain if the internet is a force of good or not.

English computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee 3rd left on the podium best known as the inventor of the World Wide Web attends an event at the CERN in Meyrin near Geneva Switzerland

Berners-Lee, the English software engineer who submitted his proposal for what would evolve into the World Wide Web 30 years ago Tuesday, said in a letter that his invention no longer serves its true objective to promote the free exchange of information around the globe. At the Web@30 conference, hosted by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Switzerland on Tuesday, he shared his ideas for reforming the web on a global scale.

Berners-Lee reminisced about how he was really out to get disparate computer systems to talk to one another, and resolve the "burning frustration" over a "lack of interoperability" of documentation from disparate computing systems used at CERN in the late 1980s. "We need open web champions within government - civil servants and elected officials who will take action when private sector interests threaten the public good and who will stand up to protect the open web".

"The Contract for the Web recognizes that whether humanity, in fact, is constructive or not actually depends on the way you write the code of the social network", he said.

For the past decade, Berners-Lee has published an open letter every March 12, taking the WWW's anniversary as an opportunity to voice his opinions and concerns on the emerging issues facing our increasingly internet-reliant society. Berners-Lee brought the site online from a lab in the Swiss Alps in 1991. And they have a responsibility to protect people's rights and freedoms online.

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