Acknowledging frustration, Britain`s May calls on parliament to deliver Brexit

May meets EU leaders but Labour talks yet to produce 'clear shift'

May meets EU leaders but Labour talks yet to produce 'clear shift'

The late-night deal means Britain will not crash out of the bloc on Friday and gives Mrs May more than the three months she had asked for to build a parliamentary majority behind the withdrawal treaty she negotiated with the European Union a year ago.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel has delivered a blow to UK PM Theresa May, after insisting a "longer" Brexit extension than the one asked for by the beleaguered Tory leader may be required.

The deal has drawn sharp criticism from Tory Eurosceptics and prompted questions about how long Mrs May can stay in power.

While London has already been granted a delay until Friday, UK Prime Minister Theresa May has requested a new delay until June 30.

Mrs May was still clinging to the hope on Thursday morning that she can persuade Parliament to ratify a Withdrawal Agreement in time to avoid the European elections.

"But the choices we now face are stark and the timetable is clear. So we must now press on at pace with our efforts to reach consensus on a deal that is in the national interest", she said, adding that she would not pretend that the next few weeks "will be easy or there is a simple way to break the deadlock in parliament".

European Council president Donald Tusk did not rule out further extensions beyond October.

McDonnell himself told me he thought it impossible all the necessary legislation could be passed by the end of June, let alone the end of May - and even in the highly unlikely event that an entente could be reached between opposition and government (the talks so far have not resulted in agreement on anything of substance, McDonnell said).

"Please do not waste this time".

"The pressure on her to go will increase dramatically, I suspect, now".

British Prime Minister Theresa May said she would now keep working to get her withdrawal agreement approved by parliament to ensure an orderly split, saying her goal was to leave "as soon as possible".

"People expected to leave on March 29 and here we are heading towards Halloween. I think still everything is possible".

No decision until end of season, says Hazard over Chelsea exit
Until 2005, winners did not qualify automatically until when Liverpool won the tournament but did not finish in the top four. But if winners finish outside the top four, it will mean five English teams will be in the Champions League group stages.

The extension to the autumn will fuel demands from angry Tory backbenchers for Mrs May to resign and hand over to a new leader.

And she stressed that "allowing people to decide if they still want to leave is now imperative".

When Nick Ferrari asked whether he would back it again, Mr Davis said: "I don't like the damn thing".

Mr Mundell refused to say if the prospect of a second Brexit referendum had been discussed in talks between the Government and Labour.

If no agreement is reached on Wednesday, the legal default is that Britain leaves the European Union without a deal on Friday.

"The October 31 deadline protects us" because it is "a key date, before the installation of a new European Commission", he said.

The diplomat specified that one of the legal means was the United Kingdom government's refusal to nominate a commissioner.

Over a dinner of scallop salad, cod loin and macadamia nut parfait, it soon emerged that France was almost isolated, with only a handful of member states, such as Belgium, sounding sympathetic to his arguments.

She consulted Attorney General Geoffrey Cox by telephone before confirming that the new deal was acceptable.

But senior British sources indicated that the PM intends to stand by her promise to the party's backbench 1922 Committee to stand down once the first phase of Brexit negotiations are complete.

Mrs Leadsom confirmed the House of Commons intends to be in recess after it rises on Thursday until April 23.

Meanwhile, DUP leader Arlene Foster, former Tory leader Iain Duncan Smith and former Cabinet minister Owen Paterson were meeting European Union chief negotiator Michel Barnier on Thursday to discuss issues related to the Northern Ireland backstop.

Recommended News

We are pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news.
Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper.
Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.