Burger King testing out vegetarian Whopper

Burger King tests meatless ‘Impossible Whopper’	 	 	 			Burger King is testing out a meatless version of the Whopper

Burger King tests meatless ‘Impossible Whopper’ Burger King is testing out a meatless version of the Whopper

Burger King this week is introducing a meat-free version of its iconic Whopper based on a patty from Impossible Foods.

Burger King's "whopper" of a contribution to the meatless fast food landscape is, at least for now, still theoretical.

In the spirit of the season, the company even pranked a bunch of beef devotees with their new burger, which you can watch above. "The people you will see here are real people, and these are their real reactions".

On Monday Burger King and Silicon Valley startup Impossible Foods announced the rollout of the Impossible Whopper in 59 stores in and around St. Louis, Missouri.

Earlier this year, Impossible Foods unveiled a new recipe for its Impossible Burger that was meant to make it look and taste more like real meat than the last version.

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"It's definitely a milestone for Impossible Foods", Fernando Machado, Burger King's global chief marketing officer, said, adding that 90 percent of those who try the new product can not differentiate it from a regular Whopper. Such a move would make the chain the undisputed king of the fake-meat burger.

Chris Finazzo, president of Burger King North America, said the chain is hoping the burger allows "somebody who wants to eat a burger every day, but doesn't necessarily want to eat beef everyday, permission to come into the restaurants more frequently", CNN reported. In January, Carl's Jr. started offering a meatless "Beyond Meat" option at more than 1,000 locations. "What (customers) don't want to give up on is flavor". For starters, the veg version will cost almost a dollar more than the original Whopper, a significant increase in the price-sensitive fast-food market. White Castle sells an Impossible Slider at its 370-plus locations.

Impossible Foods, based in Redwood City, California, launched its first faux meat patty over two years ago.

Impossible Foods was founded in 2011 by Pat Brown, a former Stanford University professor. A genetically modified yeast creates the key ingredient, called heme, which makes the patties appear to bleed and taste like real meat. It's also a way to encourage vegan and vegetarian eaters to check out Burger King.

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