EC launches artificial intelligence pilot to test draft guidelines

EC launches artificial intelligence pilot to test draft guidelines

EC launches artificial intelligence pilot to test draft guidelines

It remains to be seen whether the ethical focus can make a difference to Europe's relative laggard status in an A.I. scene that is now dominated by the US and China.

The guidelines also urge policies that ensure accountability for artificial intelligence systems and for security and reliability of artificial intelligence algorithms as it deals with errors or inconsistencies.

The European Commission, the bloc's executive arm, unveiled a framework aimed at boosting trust in AI by ensuring, for example, data about EU citizens are not used to harm them.

It also wants the data collected by AIs to be kept secure, private and to not be used to discriminate, adding that AI systems should embrace diversity and "consider the whole range of human abilities, skills and requirements, and ensure accessibility".

Including University College Cork's Prof Barry O'Sullivan, the group will now make itself available to industry, research institutes and public authorities under a pilot phase to cooperate on what amounts to a loose framework for discouraging developers to follow a potentially risky path. The European Commission on Monday unveiled ethics guidelines calling for "trustworthy AI", that are created to influence the development of AI systems before they become deeply embedded in society.

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These guidelines, said the European Union, are just preliminary, and in 2020 it will produce another report after receiving feedback from companies. It will likewise include organizations from different nations and universal associations.

"Industries such as Amazon, Google, Uber, and Boeing have been rocked this year with issues regarding the fairness, accuracy, and safety of AI-based algorithms and autonomous systems", Kisselburgh said. It is only with trust that our society can fully benefit from technologies.

"We must ensure in Germany and Europe that we do not only discuss AI but also make AI", he said. These guidelines help lay out a path forward to realizing these goals.

While the guidelines are far from legally binding, should they be considered acceptable by developers, academics, human rights groups, and businesses, we may find that they provide the foundation for European Union legislation in the future. "If so, did you put in place more specific mechanisms of control and oversight?"; "Did you assess potential forms of attacks to which the AI system could be vulnerable?"; and "Did you put in place ways to measure whether your system is making an unacceptable amount of inaccurate predictions?" The pilot phase will also involve companies from non-EU countries and worldwide organisations.

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