Former United Nation aid worker jailed in Nepal for sexually abusing boys

Canadian national sentenced to nine years imprisonment on paedophilia charges

Canadian national sentenced to nine years imprisonment on paedophilia charges

A prominent Canadian aid worker and former United Nations official has been jailed in Nepal for sexually abusing children in a landmark case that has shaken up the humanitarian community.

"He was sentenced to nine years in jail in one case and to seven years in the other", said Thakur Nath Trital, information officer at the court in Kavre district, 30 km (20 miles) east of Kathmandu.

His lawyer says they plan to appeal the ruling, because Dalglish was wrongly convicted.

Peter John Dalglish, 62, from Ontario, had helped children in poor countries for years with the organization he co-founded, Street Kids International, which ended up becoming part of the charity Save the Children.

In addition to the prison term, the court ordered Peter Dalglish to pay his victims the equivalent of US$5,000 each, the CTV News reported.

Dalgish was a former UN humanitarian agency worker for the UN-Habitat in Afghanistan, UN Mission for Ebola Emergency Response in Liberia and also in Darfur of Sudan. Investigators claim that Dalglish cajoled the destitute boys with pledges of jobs, education, and trips before sexually abusing them.

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Global activists have said the ruling was just one step in addressing accusations of sexual abuse against children in Nepal, where nongovernmental organizations operate with limited oversight. In 2016, he was awarded the Order of Canada - the country's second-highest civilian honour - for his work with disadvantaged children.

Nepalese police arrested him in the early hours of April 8 a year ago in a raid on the mountain home he had built in the village of Kartike, east of the capital of Kathmandu. Both boys were in his residence when he changed into once arrested.

Worldwide activists following Dalglish's case said the ruling was just one step in addressing grave accusations of sexual abuse against children in Nepal, where thousands of nongovernmental organisations operate with limited oversight.

Weak law enforcement has made Nepal notorious for sexual predators, with several arrests and convictions in recent years.

The report followed the exposure of abuse by Oxfam aid workers in Haiti in 2011.

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