Novak Djokovic Beats Roger Federer in Fifth-Set Tiebreaker to Win Wimbledon

Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic

Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic

The first set lasted almost an hour, alone, and ended after a tie-break, but the second set would easily go to Federer.

Djokovic moved to within a set of a fifth Wimbledon title after fighting back from a set point down to claim the third set at the end of another tense tie break.

Clocking in at four hours and 57 minutes, the match was the longest men's singles final in Wimbledon history, and had it not been for a new rule that requires a tie-breaker if both players score 12-12 in the final set, it could have gone even longer. It was long. It had everything. So did he. I thought we played some great tennis. He twice trailed by a set.

A diving volley victor at 5-5 and 15-30 prevented Federer establishing two break points, while having let the Swiss take an 8-7 lead with an opportunity to serve for the match, he immediately broke back.

He sent a forehand wide on the first championship point, and Djokovic produced a cross-court forehand victor on the next.

Djokovic commended his opponent, saying "I think that if this is not the most exciting final then it's definitely in the top two or three of my career against one of the greatest players of all time, Roger, who I respect". "It's unreal to be two match points down and come back".

Looking at the bigger picture, there's also this takeaway from Sunday: Nadal's status as Federer's principal nemesis has been well-documented and much-examined over the years which is a small part of why Friday's semifinal victory for Federer was fraught with meaning.

Yet it was the two match points squandered with the game at 8-7 that came back to haunt Federer, as like in the earlier tie breaks, Djokovic moved into a commanding 6-3 lead before completing his title defence with a fierce serve down the middle.

Hong Kong protesters march in new outpouring of grievances
Earlier on Sunday, hundreds of journalists joined a silent march to demand better treatment from police at protests. The town has previously been a battleground for Hong Kong people angry over the flood of Chinese day-trippers.

The New York Times summed up the crowd's reaction: When Federer made an error, there were groans; when Djokovic made an error, there was applause.

By the reverberating sound of things around the old arena Sunday, a vast majority of the spectators were pulling for the popular Federer.

But he won the key points - and none more so than in the final set. You have to compliment both players.

And then there were the "Awwwws". Still, even though Federer did get broken in that set, he won it to send this match to a fifth.

Federer won 15 points more than Novak, dominating with 94 winners and 61 unforced errors while the Serb stayed on 54 winners and 52 mistakes, with the Swiss scoring seven breaks in comparison to three he suffered.

That's not to say the tennis was flawless, because both men showed signs of fatigue and perhaps nerves. "He tried to be bold on the second, but Novak Djokovic came up with the pass".

As the newfangled tiebreaker carried the last set alone past the two-hour mark, it was Djokovic who was better.

Per his unorthodox tradition, the Serbian player bent down, plucked a few blades of grass from Centre Court and proceeded to munch. "Novak, congratulations, man, that was insane", Federer said. "Every win, every extra win, adds to the tally".

Recommended News

We are pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news.
Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper.
Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.