Android users can log into some Google services using their fingerprint

Using the FIDO2 standard, created to improve authentication on the web (as opposed to on an Android app) users will only have to register their fingerprint or screen lock on their phone once to use it for a native app or the compatible Google services sites on the internet.

If you want to try this out for yourself, the feature is rolling out to Pixel devices right now and will be made available to all Android phones running 7.0 Nougat or later "over the next few days".

Google points out to those anxious about privacy, that fingerprints are never sent to Google's servers and are stored securely on the user's phone.

Google now allows you to log into your account using your phone's fingerprint sensor. Technically, the functionality can only be used to access one Google service for now: Chrome's built-in list of your saved passwords.

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There's nothing extra for you to set up: if you have a Google account attached to your Android phone this will work for you. And you can test out how well this new system works by running a little test on your Android device. The authentication happens on-device, only a key demonstrating the validity of your fingerprint is sent online.

So what is the advantage for Android users?

What Google did say in its blog posts was "you will start seeing more places where local alternatives to passwords are accepted as an authentication mechanism for Google and Google Cloud services", so that gives us some hope for a password less future.

Online biometric authentication is available starting today on Chrome for Android. That will remove the need for you to enter your account's password manually, saving a lot of your time, especially if you are bad at remembering passwords.

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