First Vulcan Flight to Launch Mission to the Moon

Plans Detailed For First US Mission To Land On Moon Since Apollo

Plans Detailed For First US Mission To Land On Moon Since Apollo

Astrobotic has selected United Launch Alliance's (ULA) Vulcan Centaur rocket in a competitive commercial procurement to launch its Peregrine lunar lander to the Moon in 2021. In November past year, Astrobotic was the company that competed for $2.6 billion and the plan to develop technologies that could explore the Moon in twenty missions, and create small spacecraft.

Vulcan Centaur is the successor to ULA's workhorse Atlas V rocket, which has launched many high-profile spacecraft over the years, including NASA's Curiosity Mars rover, New Horizons Pluto probe and OSIRIS-REx asteroid mission. That launch will be Vulcan's first, and a major test for a rocket that will become the backbone of ULA's defence against rival boosters from billionaire Elon Musk's SpaceX and other companies. ULA will launch the lander as part of Astrobotic's $79.5M contract that covers the deployment of up to 14 NASA-sponsored payloads through the Peregrine lander, ULA said Monday.

The mission will carry expertise and experiments to the moon below a NASA program that will lay the groundwork for astronaut journeys by 2024 underneath the optimistic schedule laid out by the Trump administration.

Space X's Tesla Roadster 'completes its first lap of the sun'
Luckily enough, Starman had already passed the orbit of Mars and was heading out toward the asteroid belt by November past year . The next time Starman and the Roadster will get close to the Earth will come on November 5th, 2020.

While SpaceX has already slashed the cost of launches with its reusable rocket technology, Amazon.com Inc founder Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin, whose BE-4 engines power the Vulcan, is also working on a heavy-lift booster.

According to an August 19 (ULA) press release, the mission "will serve as the first of two certification flights required for ULA's U.S. Air Force certification process". Also, Israel was the one that sends a robotic on the Moon but crashed at the final step. This contract with ULA was the result of a highly competitive commercial process, and we are grateful to everyone involved in helping us make low-priced lunar transportation possible.

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