Australia acts to block Christchurch terrorist video access

Australia blocks websites hosting Christchurch attack videos

Australia blocks websites hosting Christchurch attack videos

"So those hosting this material do so in the full knowledge that Australia will take action to halt its continued proliferation", eSafety Commissioner Julie Inman Grant said.

"We can not allow this type of horrific material to be used to incite further violence or terrorist acts", he said.

The order issued on Sunday covers just eight websites, after several stopped hosting the material, or ceased operating, such as 8chan.

"These tend to be on what we refer to as "fringe" sites that revel in all forms of gore and violence".

Under the terms of the order, these eight websites will be blocked for a further six months.

Three of the five notices had been complied with, but no prosecutions had yet been initiated.

Furthermore, while the eSafety commissioner does not have the capacity to review all of the content available on each website, two of the eight websites are known for providing access to child sexual abuse material; two others are known for providing access to abhorrent violent material; and another is a self-described "World News, Politics and the Threat of Islam" blog.

As the shooting unfolded, Australia's largest internet service providers (ISPs), including Telstra and Optus, blocked users from 43 different sites.

"Industry recognised that this was the right thing to do, without explicit government direction, and we are pleased to see the framework that is now in place as a result of constructive collaboration between industry, government, and its agencies".

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Speaking with ABC Radio's AM program, Commissioner Inman Grant stated that her eSafety office had received 413 reports of malicious content online since the aforementioned Abhorrent Violent Material bill had been put in place.

"There wasn't a Government direction at that time". Communications minister Paul Fletcher likewise said blocks didn't represent a "universal solution". Copies of the distressing 17-minute live stream circulated online after his arrest.

The ISPs asked for legal backing of their actions.

Telcos had already voluntarily placed their own block on the sites five months ago, but with violent footage still being hosted, the new eSafety Commissioner demanded a further six month extension.

"We do not want Australians to have exposure or access to this material", she told AM. "I don't see any public interest in making this kind of material that is created to humiliate and to incite further terrorist acts and hatred".

It is the first time the commissioner has directly ordered ISPs to block content.

The government said that the commissioner is working with telcos on a protocol for rapid takedowns of terror material during crisis events.

Mr Stanton is hopeful the protocol will ensure a more timely and coordinated response in the future.

Mr Fletcher is confident that will be the case.

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