Linked lung injury may be caused by toxic fumes: U.S. study

A man uses a vape as he walks on Broadway in New York City U.S

A man uses a vape as he walks on Broadway in New York City U.S

Larsen told The New York Times that the injuries to the patients resemble those in people exposed to mustard gas, a chemical weapon used in World War I. Mustard gas was used as recently as 2016 when the Islamic State fired a rocket containing the substance at USA soldiers at a military base near Mosul, Iraq. "Or in World War II with chlorine gas".

"In fact, moving forward, we could see Vapour Pen sales increase if consumers in adult-use states move their purchases from the black market and into licensed dispensaries where they can be confident they will be able to purchase fully regulated and tested products", reads a blog post from Headset.

The theory that oils or lipids caused these injuries has persisted because biopsies aren't commonly ordered for these lung injury cases, Larsen said. Seven of the cases have been male patients and two have been female patients, and the average age of the patients has been about 25.

The researchers looked at samples of lung tissue from 17 people, all of whom had vaped and 70% had used marijuana or cannabis oils.

All of the patients examined had severe forms of the illness, and two had died.

Dr Branden Larsen, senior creator, acknowledged: "Whereas we can now no longer decrease label the aptitude characteristic of lipids, we be pleased now no longer viewed anything to counsel right here is an bid attributable to lipid accumulation within the lungs". Numerous cases involved otherwise healthy teens and young adults who required hospital intensive care and respirators to maintain breathing.

Not one of the 17 circumstances confirmed clear indicators of lipoid pneumonia, such because the presence of enormous oil droplets within the lungs, mentioned Brandon Larsen, a surgical pathologist on the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona. Larsen said he hopes these findings will guide public policy that governs or restricts e-cigarettes, and the ongoing federal and state searches for the cause of the outbreak. The lung biopsies don't provide hints as to what the toxin might be, but Larsen said he suspected it could be some sort of contaminant in the vaping liquid.

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"Like they'll put a bunch of Vaseline in their noses and then they'll lie down to sleep", he said, "and the Vaseline will gurgle into their lungs".

Rather, the injuries were consistent with exposure to toxic chemicals. "I wish we knew what that substance was".

And on Wednesday, Los Angeles County banned flavored forms of e-cigarettes - echoing a move made recently by MI and the state of NY.

Researchers say they all showed acute lung injury, including pneumonitis - inflammation of the lung tissue - and two of the patients died.

In Arizona, Governor Doug Ducey has said he's "concerned" about the problem but not ready to take any immediate action banning vaping products.

That is the findings of a report from doctors at the Mayo Clinic, released on Wednesday. "However, there are no cases that have been shown to be associated with the use of store-purchased nicotine e-liquids, and it seems extremely unlikely that these products have any involvement in the outbreak".

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