Apple Calls New Russian Smartphone Sales Legislation 'Equivalent to Jailbreaking'

The law which will come into force on July 1 next year has been met with resistance by some electronics retailers

The law which will come into force on July 1 next year has been met with resistance by some electronics retailers

Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed off on the law requiring most electronics sold in the country to be pre-bundled with domestically produced software.

Electronic retailers have already criticized the law, which is due to come into force on July 1 next year, and say the legislation was adopted without consulting them.

Student taken into custody after threatening school shooting in Faribault
Waukesha police have not identified that student or commented on the extent of his injuries or whether his weapon was loaded. That shooting happened after another student told a school resource officer that a classmate had a handgun, Jack said.

The law supposedly helps Russian developers better compete with the foreign tech firms that now dominate in the nation. The law has also sparked fears that Russian Federation could use the pre-installed apps as a way to spy on its citizens. The country's mobile phone market is dominated by foreign companies including Apple, Samsung and Huawei. Apple bods have been anonymously quoted as saying the mandate would "be equivalent to jailbreaking, it would pose a security threat, and the company can not tolerate that kind of risk". "It would pose a security threat, and the company can not tolerate that kind of risk".

Russian officials have said the law is a "symmetrical response" after Russia's state-funded channel RT - which U.S. authorities accuse of spreading propaganda - was required to register its U.S. operating unit under the U.S. Foreign Agents Registration Act. Human Rights Watch said the internet blocking bill "is bad news for Russian Federation and creates a unsafe precedent for other countries". The nation recently passed a "sovereign internet law" that gives the government power to block access to web content in any situation it deems to be an "emergency".

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