Brick by Lego brick, teen builds own prosthetic arm

David Aguliar poses with his prosthetic arm built with Lego pieces during an interview with Reuters in Sant Cugat del Valles

David Aguliar poses with his prosthetic arm built with Lego pieces during an interview with Reuters in Sant Cugat del Valles

Fan of Iron Man?

David Aguilar, 19, who studies bioengineering at the Universitat Internacional de Catalunya in Spain, is already using his fourth model of the colourful prosthetic and his dream is to design affordable robotic limbs for those who need them.

David Aguilar has been building Legos since he was 5, locking pieces together with just one hand because he was born without his lower arm. "I wanted to... see myself in the mirror like I see other guys, with two hands".

While there are pictures of Han Solo in the background of many of his videos, Aguilar pays tribute to another famous sci-fi renegade: Tony Stark, the billionaire inventor from Marvel comics and Avengers movies.

Iran unveils underground ballistic missile factory for 1st time
Hardline clerics and the Revolutionary Guards opposed the nuclear deal reached by moderate President Hassan Rouhani. President Donald Trump pulled out of the nuclear deal past year and reimposed sanctions on Iran.

Calling himself HandSolo on YouTube, Aguilar has been building artificial limbs for himself since he was nine years old, according to a report in Reuters. Stark names his Iron Man suits Mark-1, Mark-2, and Aguilar has followed suit.

The MK II was a predominantly blue model built from a Lego plane set, including a motor, while MK III was created from a set for a piece of mining equipment. In need of an affordable prosthetic Aguilar chose to build himself an arm out of materials readily available around the house - Lego blocks. In 2013, amputee Christina Stephens experimented with a prosthetic leg made entirely of Lego pieces, with colorful results.

On graduating from university, Aguilar hopes his plans for affordable prosthetics lift off. "To make them feel like a normal person", he said.

"I started making many 3D-printed hand prostheses for fun", Martinez recently told Business Insider's Spanish edition. Never tell this guy the odds.

Recommended News

We are pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news.
Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper.
Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.